New Triple Exposure galleries online!

New galleries of some of the top shots taken by the Triple Exposure young photographers are now available online.

Check out two new Triple Exposure albums on the TYO Facebook page –

The City of Nablus
and
The Children of Nablus

‘Ana beheb Nablus’ (I love Nablus). By Shahd, age 15, from El Ein refugee camp, Nablus.

A sample from these collections is also viewable on the news site Palestine Monitor.

 

 

Flower Habibis

colorful sea scenes

The second week of our Ramadan arts course revolved around the theme of nature – from the sea, to the land, to the sky. We asked the kids, ages 4 and 5, to demonstrate how plants grow. And they showed us step by step – digging the hole, planting the seed, adding water and the rays of the sun, sprouting and slowly growing till we all were trees swaying in the breeze, arms aloft.

planting flowers

We then put these ideas into action, planting flowers along the entrance of the TYO center. The children loved digging about and watering the plants, seeing their efforts leave something beautiful to brighten up the way into TYO for everyone that comes here.

The houses and multi-story apartments in this neighbourhood (Khallet al-Amood) are built close together, rising vertically up the hillside, with unforgiving steps replacing streets between the densely populated homes. Thanks both to the geography and to urban planning, they rarely have gardens, so a flower-planting activity is a great opportunity for the kids to get their hands dirty, learn a little more about nature and see how we can brighten up even inner city environments.

The next day we moved onto painting. After some butterfly themed stories and games with core teachers Jawad and Haitham, the children painted half a butterfly, folding it in half to print the same colourful pattern on the opposite wing. Each symmetrical creation was unique, bringing joy to the kids as they saw through each step to make their own butterflies and take them home to show all the family.

butterflies / flutter byes

Triple Exposure mural complete at Khadijia School, Nablus

The TYO mural class have completed the seventeenth Triple Exposure mural in Nablus. Across three visits to the school, mural teacher Rimah and her volunteers worked with the team of twelve students, ages ten to twelve, to finish this large mural on the external wall of the school for all to see.

Highlighting the importance of creative play as a part of a holistic education, the book in the centre reads ‘My right to play’. The book symbolizes learning and communication, and the sunset landscape, the undeniable beauty of Palestine.

mural at Khadijia School

unexpected visitors

mural complete!

‘Shooting back from Palestine’ exhibition in TYO Nablus

Tomorrow’s Youth Organization, Nablus is proud to host ‘Shooting back from Palestine’, an exhibition of youth photography.

In association with the Paltel Group Foundation and the Palestinian Youth Association for Leadership and Rights Activation (PYALARA), the opening ceremony will be held this Sunday (24th July 2011), 12pm, at the TYO Center (Zafer al-Masri Foundation Building),  Khallet Al-Amood, Nablus.

Tomorrow’s Youth Organization has its own youth arts and photography program, Triple Exposure  and is delighted to host such a like minded project and inspire our own young photographers and artists.

Please join us this Sunday to view this amazing collection of photos from all over Palestine.

The exhibit will run for two days.

Triple Exposure murals complete in Askar boys’ school

Triple Exposure mural teacher Rimah and her volunteers went to visit the boys’ school in Askar UNRWA refugee camp, Nablus. Over two visits she worked with fifteen boys, ages 10-11 on two murals in the hallways of the school. Whilst representing the themes of nature and school, these murals have a more kaleidoscopic feel to them, with unexpected colours inside the branches and leaves of the tree, really bringing an extra splash of colour to the walls of Askar.

Like many schools in the West Bank, the school doesn’t have an art teacher or art department, and these were the first murals ever in the school. Even the teachers were interested in how the different colours were mixed and applied. The director of the school liked the mural so much he has asked Rimah to come back and do one more any time.

After they had finished the murals, the boys wanted to go home and show their parents they had been working with paint, and thoroughly enjoyed drawing moustaches on each other. The boys showed so much talent and dedication, seeing the project through to completion with admirable focus. If they had an art teacher or more opportunities to practice, the kids could really work on their art skills and creative thinking, on top of making these vibrant and lasting contributions to their community.

To date, Triple Exposure has complete fifteen murals around Nablus. For more details, please see the Triple Exposure blog.

Painting complete in Nablus Basic School

The Triple Exposure mural class were busy painting during June and have brightened up a hallway in UNRWA Nablus Basic School. The students worked together in class to come up with ideas of how to protect the environment, and images that they could create to represent these. They personified the environment as the sun and the water droplet, and showed that if we leave taps running we are wasting a precious resource, and if we pollute the skies we ultimately damage ourselves. The earth represents the one planet we all share.

After painting their designs onto hardwood, the art work was then installed in the school. On Thursday, mural teacher Rimah took the students to view their painting, and both the students and the school were delighted with the finished piece.

The mural class and their painting

Triple Exposure trip to Beit Ferik olive groves

Last week we took one of the advanced photography classes to the village of Beit Ferik, a few kilometres from the city of Nablus. In groups of twos and threes they shared the DSLR cameras and put into practice what they had recently been learning about nature photography. Students were given a checklist to inspire them to capture the beauty of nature and get them thinking about composition, colour, light and shadow.

In Palestine, the olive tree is prized for its historical presence, its beauty, its symbolism and most importantly economic significance. The trees are important as they have long been a key part of the country’s agricultural output: olives, oil and wood. Nablus itself is famous for soap made from olive oil, and it is still made in the couple of the factories left in the city today.

In recent years, many olive groves in the west bank have been destroyed, but the ancient trees that remain rooted in the land, embody the history and durability of the Palestinian people.

Here are some of the top shots from the day.  For more photos, please see the Triple Exposure blog.

by Noha

by Taha

by Samee

by Hala

by Amira

by Samee

For more photos, please see the Triple Exposure blog.

New Triple Exposure workshop – Notes from Nablus – Balata

Portraits of kids, by kids: presenting the faces and voices of Nabulsi youth to the world.

Aya - we are all one family

The best way to let the children of Nablus try out digital photography is to take the cameras to them. So June saw the start of our new Triple Exposure workshop – Notes from Nablus. Our first location was Balata UNRWA refugee camp.

After some Q&A on portraits and basic tips on composition we went over how to use the DSLR cameras – as it was the first time for the nine to eleven year olds, we kept it simple by talking about how to use the viewfinder, zoom, flash and how to hold the camera. Everyone made colourful name cards and took each others’ portraits to practice taking shots.

On day two we started by discussing what Nablus means to us. The children talked about what they love about Nablus, and what they would change if they could. They then brainstormed in groups and presented what they’re most proud of about their city/country, and how they would improve it if they were in charge. The levels of political and historical consciousness were impressive despite the young age of the participants.

Finally, we asked the children to each choose a short message to send out to the world from Balata/Nablus/Palestine. After writing the messages on each others’ hands, they took each others’ portraits once again and came up with this series of wonderful portraits which give voice to the children of Balata.

Please see the Notes from Nablus gallery for more photos.

Triple Exposure mural complete in Balata Girls’ School

This month, TYO mural teacher Rimah visited Balata girls’ school in the UNRWA refugee camp, Nablus. Over multiple visits she worked with two groups of girls, ages ten to twelve, to complete two murals either side of the sinks in the school.

The ice breakers and games on the first day really helped pull the groups together and let Rimah know what the girls are interested in. The final game centred on each person saying their name plus the meaning and their favourite subject at school, this brought forth a deluge of information about their interests, families, and dreams. The girls really loved having someone to listen to them.

To get the students started, she let them draw anything they want. And then to get them thinking about the theme, they drew something that symbolizes water and the importance of it to life. After coming up with designs, they drew these onto the walls together before starting painting.

Water shortage is a major issue in Palestine, one complicated further by desertification, climate change, and limited access to resources. The two murals were strategically placed by the sinks to remind the girls to be careful with this precious resource: no water, no life.

One of the two groups had been chosen specifically by the school director due to a history behavioural difficulties such as bad language and fighting in school. As hoped, they responded so well to the mural painting process and added incentive of doing another mural in the future. The teachers said were delighted at the transformation and how cooperative the girls were. They really came together to pool their talents and work as a team. This just goes to show that a little extra attention and creativity can work wonders for any child.

Each group had its own personality – while one was more aggressive, the other was quite shy, so Rimah decided to assign tasks and roles to play to their strengths and work on their weaknesses. For example, giving the girls individual responsibilities like keeping extra students away from the work in progress, or individual areas to paint and colours to mix, especially for the shyer students. The relative privacy of the areas given allowed them the space and time to come out of their shells naturally.

These are not simply paintings on walls, they are a way for kids here to develop their creative and collaborative skills, and make a lasting contribution to their community they can be proud of.

Please see tripleexposure.net for more information our arts projects.

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Triple Exposure Rockin’ Out

My 12-14 year-olds coming from the local camps arrived at TYO enthused, eager and ready to learn. Weeks before, they had signed up for my photography class, Triple Exposure, hailing from all the local refugee camps: Old Askar, New Askar, Balata and Al-Ein.  Additionally, a few others come from the surrounding neighborhood of Khalleh and the Old City of Nablus.

While the focus of our first week was to introduce the students to TYO and our overall goals for the semester, we branched off and found many great, unexpected successes. The students showed skills that I thought would take time to develop such as creativity and perspective. The scavenger hunt activity that we did on day one gives testament to these skills.

The angles, use of light, and their passion was evident with each photograph. Furthermore, I thought that it would take many classes- even weeks for the students to learn how to use a Nikon or Canon DSLR camera; however, this was not the case. The students masterfully focused on their subject, adjusted the magnification and great photos resulted. Continue reading